Meet Ole Sturm, creator of Orbital 3 and Marble Earth

Q. When did you begin animating? (Or how long have you been animating stock footage?).

I started in computer graphics and animation back in 1990 when I completed a computer graphics course in Munich. Initially it was just desktop publishing but I soon got drawn into the animation side of things and in 1995 started animating for playback graphics on Mission: Impossible. More films soon followed and in 2000 I took part in a recce on the USS Stennis aircraft carrier in San Diego, where we were researching screen interfaces for Behind Enemy Lines. This research led to my first contact with Artbeats with the idea to produce the Control Panels 2 product, back in 2004.

 

Q. What is your favorite subject to animate?

I love the Orbital 2 and Starfields 2 series. I’ve always been a sci-fi fan so anything that gets me into space, even if it’s just on a screen, is sure to get my attention.

RBL212 - Space satellite above thick clouds of Earth's atmosphere

RBL212 (from Orbital 2)- Space satellite above thick clouds.

STA203

STA203 (from Starfields 2)- A red planet shadows three glowing hexagons.

 

Q. Which computer and software do you prefer for animating stock footage?

Currently I work on a late 2013 MacPro (the trashcan model) with the highest specs available, including 64GB of RAM. The software I primarily rely on consists of After Effects for the compositing and 2d animation side of things and Cinema 4D for the 3d side of things. On the periphery I use Photoshop and Illustrator and a host of plugins such as Trapcode’s Particular.

 

Q. What’s your favorite clip that you currently have represented in the Artbeats FootageHub?

I think that would have to be RBL114 or STA216  I just love the serenity of those two shots. I listened to a lot of Vangelis (yes, including Blade Runner) whilst working on these two compilations.

RBL114 (from Orbital 1) - Sunrise over Earth's horizon as if viewed from space

RBL114 (from Orbital 1) – Sunrise over Earth’s horizon as if viewed from space

STA216 (from Starfields 2) - Drifting through a star field toward a glowing band of golden clouds

STA216 (from Starfields 2) – Drifting through a star field toward a glowing band of golden clouds

 

Q. What advice can you give to animators who are just getting started in the stock footage industry?

Find a subject that inspires you and the rest is easy. Working on Orbital I found that 8 hours would pass and it felt like 2 or 3 hours. It was just Zen-like.

 

Q. What is the one thing you wished you’d been able to animate?

I wish I’d had my new computer when I was animating the Starfields product – playing around with that many particles was really tough on my old MacPro (late 2008 model) and there were times when I just wanted to give up – it… was… that… slow……. I’m thinking of getting Phil interested in a second batch of starfields and have got my eye on X Particles for Cinema 4D.

 

Bonus Questions:

1. What’s the last movie you saw in a theater?

I don’t make it to the cinema very often unless it’s with my 8 year-old son – I think the last one was Turbo. My wife and I are booked to go see Gone Girl though

2.  What’s your guilty pleasure TV?

The Walking Dead and documentaries – the other night it was Stonehenge Empire.

 3. What’s your favorite gadget/app?

Hmmm, after being a complete app addict when the first iPhone came out I’ve now settled down to mostly using my phone and iPad for reading news to which end I rely on Zite, Flipboard and Feedly. Oh, and Plex, I love watching movies on my iPad.

 

About Ole Sturm:

Ole and his son Per at the British Museum during their June/July holiday

Ole and his son Per at the British Museum during their June/July holiday

 

With a background in fine arts (majoring in sculpture) Ole has been working in film and various computer graphics related industries since 1987. His career path began in London working in visual effects and then moved to film production, props and set-dressing in South Africa. Moving to computer graphics and animation was a natural progression once the tools reached the mainstream.

In 1996 he co-founded Bionic Productions – based at Pinewood Studios, Bionic provided interfaces and playback graphics for feature films including Mission: Impossible, The Saint, Daylight, The Jackal, Lost in Space, M:i-2 and Behind Enemy Lines.

In 2001, he and his wife moved to Melbourne where he create video content for a large variety of clients and applications as well as working as a freelance designer, animator, editor and compositor.

 

Review Ole Sturm’s footage here

An informal chat with conservationist Catherine Cunningham (Eikosphere)

Q: When did you begin shooting?

A: My father gave me his Canon AE-1 film camera for an Around the World study abroad program I participated in during my junior year at the University of Notre Dame in the 1990’s. How could one not fall in love with photography when one has the opportunity to experience and share such unique, colorful, culturally rich landscapes, people, moments in time? Over the years, my camera became my window into understanding better our natural world, my entrance into conversation with so many interesting people and communities, and my vehicle for exploring everything and anything that piqued my curiosity.

ESP-FH101-90

ESP-FH101-90 – Rugged peak in the French Alps

I am grateful for the art of photography and film to express my inner creative voice and capture meaningful moments on this life journey to share with others.

 

Q: What is your favorite subject to shoot?

A: I am compelled to teach through photography, so I am always looking for the image or collection that is going to educate us about a particular social, economic, or environmental challenge we face or new innovative pathway. I am fascinated by innovation and technology that’s next now. I am drawn to creative design, smart architecture, and urban concepts that are regenerative.

ESP-FH100-16

ESP-FH100-16 – An urban park in Panama City, Panama

I love to shoot dramatic, dynamic mountain landscapes…those where the light and energy that precede or succeed a storm just sets the film on fire. Perhaps these are my favorite also because I love those betwixt-between moments in life when we are passing through periods of great transition. I love to capture “Norman Rockwell”-like window boxes that reveal the character of a community & make a statement about the respective cultural landscape.

ESP-FH102-85

ESP-FH102-85 – A little girl in a pink cap plays in a snowdrift

I love to photograph individuals (people, animals, and plants) to somehow convey the unique miracle and beauty of each living being. This is the essence of Nature’s Reflection, my photography company, to reflect back the beauty of the natural world through photography.

 

Q: Which camera(s) do you prefer for shooting stock footage?

A: I have been a Canon-sponsored photographer (and would welcome the opportunity to be again); so shoot with and prefer canon cameras and their professional lens series. My favorite canon cameras are still the EOS cameras that produce full frame, high resolution raw images.   And as you know, I also have a Sony HDV Z series camera for shooting video.

 

Q: What’s your favorite clip that you currently have represented in the Artbeats FootageHub?

A: I believe the culture and cause footage I’ve shot around the world is probably what is special and unique about the collection of my footage. I love the mountain photography and one of the latest shoots I did capturing the Iguazu Falls on the Brazil side and the Argentina side. I happened to be there peak waterfall, flood season…and as it turns out it was an exceptionally wet and lush year.

ESP-FH104-43

ESP-FH104-43 – Iguazu Falls, Brazil/Argentina, from the Argentine side

Q: What advice can you give to shooters who are just getting started in the stock footage industry?

A: Seek and Find what you love to shoot. Find your creative voice. Master your craft. Express yourself creatively in your art…. And slowly learn the business. Like any investment portfolio; have multiple streams of revenue opportunity open…then let them flow; and hope some will flood.

 

Q: What’s the best or worst thing that happened to you on a shoot?

A: I’ve so many experiences out in the field. This question is the theme for a book I could write one day.

ESP-FH100-03

ESP-FH100-03 – Families playing in a public swimming pool in Seoul, South Korea

 

Q: What is the one thing you wished you’d been able to capture?

A: I have always been drawn to Angor Wat in Cambodia; culturally that is probably my next trip. I absolutely must see the Himalayan mountains sometime soon in my lifetime.

 

About Eikosphere:

01282014_ChamonixWinter2014_017SMall

Catherine Cunningham

Catherine Cunningham, PhD.  Catherine has produced film, photography, interactive media supporting impact ventures & sustainability programs for companies, INGO’s, and governments through her boutique PR firm, Eikosphere. Prior to starting the Eikosphere.LLC, Catherine founded Nature’s Reflection Photography. Since 2004 she has traveled widely and photographed professionally throughout Asia, Europe, the Middle East, Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America.  Her 3D Short Feature; “Code of the Heart” won the Intl. Film Festival Best of Fest in 2011 & contributed to the President of Mexico’s successful Green Growth Fund. In 2009,

Eikosphere also premiered the Eye of the Future film at the UN Climate Change Conference (IMAX theater, Copenhagen, COP 15).  Capturing clean energy technologies and designs from different world regions, Eye of the Future has subsequently been translated into 4 languages and has screened internationally. The film was released on DVD for worldwide distribution through Cinema Libre in October 2011. Catherine has interviewed over 150 global thought leaders, shot stills and video in over 1.5 years around the world with 50+ local production partners and leading sustainability organizations, including World Wisdom, Future Horizons for the Biodiversity Consortium and Singapore Innovation, and Rework the World for the Taellberg Forum, the Danish Government’s Global Green Growth Forum, Norways’s World Environment Day, Poland’s Intl. Climate Change conference.

For the past 7 years she has participated in global impact leadership forums, produced stills and video content in over 55 countries with a focus on culture, lifestyle, nature. Her PhD is from ETHZ, Switzerland in ecosystem science.

Review Eikosphere footage here.

 

Encounter with a Tornado Part 2

The June 16th Wakefield Tornado

On June 15th I learned a new weather term: Helicity. If you think of a tornado as having a vortex oriented vertically, helicity is wind rotation that is horizontal. Why is helicity important? As a thunderstorm is forming and warm air is lifting, it pulls the horizontal rotation, bending it toward the vertical, aiding in the storm rotation from which tornadoes are born. On Sunday, June 15th the helicity forecast for Monday was literally off the charts. The attached image shows this forecast as bands of color. The red indicates the maximum amount the models can show which is 860 m squared/s squared. However, the red area is huge and we can only guess how much higher the value actually was.

Helicity forcast

Helicity forecast, red is extreme.

 

The whole day of June 16th seemed unreal to me. My chase partners Skip Talbot and Jennifer Brindly Ubl and I woke up to see storms forming in southern South Dakota. We knew this was not the tornado-forming variety, but we had some time on our hands, so we drove north to take a look. The storm was bordered by a dramatic shelf cloud that moved slowly toward us.

Shooting the shelf cloud. Photo by Jennifer Brindley Ubl

Shooting the shelf cloud. Photo by Jennifer Brindley Ubl

 

A195-C022v2

Footage of the South Dakota Shelf Cloud

Underneath this structure, the cloud above us was dark, rolling and churning with spooky turbulence. The day’s helicity was very evident. I’ve shot a lot of clouds but never seen such weird movement. For lack of a better term, I call this shot my Harry Potter sky, and I absolutely love the haunting effect.

 

Harry Potter Sky (clip A195-C037v3)

The violence of the storm overtook us and we took shelter at a gas station mini-mart, but again, this was only the prelude for the day, not the main event. Soon we saw a storm initiating in our target area a hundred miles to the south and rushed to meet it.

This radar image shows the storm and our relation to it.

This radar image shows the storm and our relation to it.

As we approached, I snapped this photo through the window.

As we approached, I snapped this photo through the window.

In a very rare occurrence, two large F4 (cause catastrophic damage) tornadoes had formed and were bearing down on the small town of Pilger while we were still driving towards it. The sight of these tornadoes was surreal, they were enormous! As we found a place to park, Jennifer, who had been watching the radar, confirmed that we were in the direct path of the closest twister, so we had only a limited time to film. The conditions were less than ideal as we were in the middle of a downpour. I set the Red Epic on a tripod next to the van but everything was getting soaked. Water was splashing on the touchscreen monitor and activating the menus.

I had no control over the camera! Had I come this far just to be thwarted by a technical glitch? After an agonizing minute or so, I did a re-boot. Finally, I got a few moments of precious footage before Skip noticed a new tornado forming above our heads. “We have to leave now!” he said, so I stopped recording, grabbed the tripod with camera still attached, pulled it in the car and we took off to the east.

Northern most Pilger Tornado on our first stop.

Northern most Pilger Tornado on our first stop.

 

We found a turnout a mile or so down the road with a clear view and no rain. The twin tornadoes that had hit Pilger had wound down, but the new twister was growing in size and strength. We filmed it as it crossed the road we had driven on moments before. It was a huge multi-vortex wedge-shaped tornado that later was shown to measure F4 in strength, just spinning in the field in front of us. Are we safe? Skip says we are absolutely OK in this spot, and he is describing the event for his video record, giving us a verbal play-by-play of every detail while we watched. I hear Jennifer Brindley Ubl’s camera snapping photos. With my Canon 24-105mm lens, I zoom in on the base of the tornado to catch detail of the multi-vortex. However, I am so overwhelmed I forget to check focus and a full minute of footage is lost to this error. My wide shots are sharp however, and soon I gather my wits and start checking focus on the subsequent telephoto shots.

Jennifer captures this photo of the debris cloud shortly after the tornado crosses the road.

Jennifer captures this photo of the debris cloud shortly after the tornado crosses the road.

 

Skip notices another tornado forming to the left of the large wedge. For the second time today, two tornadoes are spinning at once, one a skinny rope, one wedge, both in frame, both F4 in strength. It’s hard to judge scale, but they are enormous as they dwarf the power line towers underneath them.  A bolt of lightning shot from the larger tornado hits the ground between the two, like an epic battle scene.  It was a rare “positive” strike that is more powerful and longer lasting than the garden-variety “negative” strikes. It took a full 17 frames at 30fps to fade. The smaller tornado whips around the larger one at a ground speed of nearly 90 miles per hour. We watch it get swallowed by the larger wedge. Unreal.

These images show the positive lightning strike between the two tornadoes.

These images show the positive lightning strike between the two tornadoes.

 

The twister gradually moves to our northeast and becomes partially obstructed by higher ground in front of us. Skip suggests we re-position to get a better view. So once again, we hop in the SUV, this time following the tornado, which is to our front and left. The twister is becoming rain-wrapped, and we lose sight of it in the precip haze. Eventually we find a perch on the top of a hill, this time getting a wider view of the storm. The tornado is gone, but we have an amazing view of the rotating cloud structure. I see dirt spinning up underneath, the sign of yet another tornado forming, but the motion disappears quickly. Still, it’s enough for me to count as I keep a tally in my head. I’ve seen 5 tornadoes today.

 


A196-C002v3 (coming soon)

Other storm chasers park nearby and I recognize John Williamson, whom I had chased with before. It’s always like that with this community, you constantly meet your friends while on the road. John points at a funnel cloud to our west. It is a skinny tail dropping out of a little white puffy. Jennifer snaps a photo and someone remarks, “The parameters are so crazy today, it’s like every cloud gets a tornado!”.

 

Funnel Cloud Photo by Jennifer Brindley Ubl.

Funnel Cloud Photo by Jennifer Brindley Ubl.

We decide to end the day with a dinner in Sioux City and talk about our adventures. Truly an amazing day. Later in my hotel room, I agonize over footage lost to soft focus, finding it hard to get the proper perspective that I have also captured some amazing images. My heart goes out to the people affected by the storms that hit Pilger and Wakefield. Artbeats will be making a donation to StormAssist whose proceeds go to the victims. Looking back, I am also grateful for Skip Talbot and Jennifer Brindly Ubl for having me along. It won’t be my last trip with you both!

 

Links:

To view clips: http://www.artbeats.com/storms2014

To view demo reel: http://youtu.be/exxyB6pG60s

http://faceofastorm.blogspot.com/2014/06/twin-tornadoes-in-nebraska-june-16th.html

http://www.skip.cc/chase/

http://stormassist.org/

 

CSC award recipient Pasha Patriki talks with Artbeats

Q: When did you begin shooting?

A: My career in film began in 1999 and since 2003 I have been professionally shooting stock footage.

 

Q: What is your favorite subject to shoot?

A: Actually, dramatic scenes with actors are my favorite.

Firemen walking on a street

FF-FH100-15 – Firemen walking on a street

 

Q: Which camera(s) do you prefer for shooting stock footage?

A: My camera of choice is Red Epic, for it’s versatility and quality.

 

Q: What’s your favorite clip that you currently have represented in the Artbeats FootageHub?

A: It’s unfair to ask a parent which one of his babies is his/her favorite. 🙂

Woman dancing on an urban rooftop

FF-FH101-07 – Woman dancing on an urban rooftop

 

Q: What advice can you give to shooters who are just getting started in the stock footage industry?

A: Shoot as much as you can, the best you can. Learn the rules. And then break them.

FF-FH101-29_Crowd

FF-FH101-29 – Fans at an outdoor concert

 

Q: What’s the best or worst thing that happened to you on a shoot?

A: Best – Having a world-known icon unexpectedly sign your release form.

FF-FH101-34DJ

FF-FH101-34 – DJ at a disco

 

Worst – dropping camera into radioactive pool of water.

FF-FH103-31

FF-FH103-31 – Teacup and saucer fall in slow-motion

 

Q: What is the one thing you wished you’d been able to capture?

A: There is not ONE thing I wish I could capture. This is an ongoing list that transforms together with our world.

 

About Pasha Patriki:

Pasha Patriki

Pasha Patriki

Since he was 4 year old, Pasha was determined to become a filmmaker. Growing up in Moscow, Russia, he started learning the craft by playing with his grandfather’s Super9 camera. Already then Pasha was striving to create narrative pieces, not just home movies.

After moving to Toronto in 1996, he started working on various film sets as a lighting technician, simultaneously studying in the Film & Video production program at York University. Today – 15 years professionally in the business – Pasha’s work as Director of Photography has been recognized in Canada as well internationally

Almost every year music videos lensed by Pasha receive nominations at Much Music Video Awards. Pasha has shot videos for notable Canadian artists like Hedley, Billy Talent, Down With Webster, Carly Rae Jepsen, Mariana’s Trench, Finger Eleven, Anjulie, and many others.

In 2014 – second year in a row – Pasha is nominated for the Best Cinematography at the CSC awards. Last year it was two nominations – one of them landing as an award for Music Video category. Pasha Patriki is a full member of CSC (Canadian Society of Cinematographers) as well as an IATSE 667 Union member in the DOP category.

Review Pasha Patriki’s footage here.

Mark Adams discusses Rocketclips beginning

Artbeats’ customers and subscribers have evinced a lot of interest in learning more about our footage producers: e.g., how they started in the business, what challenges they met, what cameras are their favorites, what advice they would give when shooting stock footage, and so forth. What would be a better way to start off a series of producer interviews than to feature Mark Adams of Rocketclips?

rocketclips

Q: When did Rocketclips begin shooting?

A: I started as an assignment still photographer in 1978 and began shooting stock stills in 1984, by the mid-90’s shooting stock stills was my full-time living. I founded Rocketclips and picked up my first video camera in 1999, by 2001 the change-over to motion was complete.

 

Q: Your library is full of great shots of people doing various activities. What is your favorite setting for capturing this “lifestyle” footage?

A: I’ve been working a lot with a set we built. We can dress it for business and medical. Sometimes it’s a living room or a bedroom. We’ve even turned it into a clothing store and a spa.

Family connecting to social media

RC-FH183-024. – African American family using cellphone and tablets

 

Q: What are some of the challenges you face with doing studio shoots vs on location?

A: I prefer to shoot indoors. It’s easier to control the environment. Being on location allows the talent to interact with the real world, things can feel more natural but the trade off is just what you would expect; weather, dirt, sand, less than interesting backgrounds, police. Among the biggest challenges we face wherever we shoot are the logistics of managing props and wardrobe. Also camera movement is a huge challenge, especially on a budget. After years as a still stock shooter, working with talent comes very naturally. It’s all the gear necessary for shooting motion that makes us crazy.

Happy friends laughing and dancing

RC-FH234-083 – Happy business colleagues dancing

 

Q: What’s your favorite clip that you currently have represented in the Artbeats FootageHub?

A: I don’t have favorite clips. I have favorite shoots. Those are the shoots when I’m at my best and I’ve got terrific talent. I bring it, they bring it and the footage looks great.

RC-FH232-134 - Young couple making faces

RC-FH232-134 – Young couple making faces

 

Q: What¹s the best or worst thing that happened to you on a shoot?

A: The best was shooting childbirth. The worst, getting arrested for shooting with out permits.

Man being arrested

RC-FH177-2009 – Man with handcuffs

 

Q: What is the one thing you wished you¹d been able to capture?

A: One time I splurged and rented a helicopter to shoot the Las Vegas strip at twilight. I didn’t have the money for a stabilized camera mount, so they took the doors off for me and I hung out hand held, totally useless footage. I envy Phil; he does wonderful aerials.

RC-FH097-001 -  Las Vegas Boulevard at night

RC-FH097-001 – Las Vegas Boulevard at night

 

Q: Which camera(s) do you prefer for shooting stock footage?

A: Right now I’m shooting with a Red Epic and I love it. Shooting raw is like a dream come true.

 

Q: What advice can you give to shooters who are just getting started in the stock footage industry?

A: Anyone being honest will tell you that shooting stock has taken a hit from lowering prices. It’s tough to make a living solely from stock. My advice? Anyone with the skill to use a tool, whether it’s a law book, a wrench or a camera can make a living with that tool, if they are talented, committed and passionate.

Young woman doing homework and talking on smart phone

RC-FH208-104 – Young woman on cellphone and studying.

 

About Rocketclips:

Mark Adams, Rocketclips

Mark Adams, Rocketclips

Rocketclips, Inc was founded by Mark Adams in 1999.
Mark is an experienced professional photographer and videographer who lives with his family in Long Beach, CA.
He graduated in 1978 from the commercial photography program at Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, California.
He began shooting stock stills in 1984 and migrated into motion with video in 1999.
Rocketclips always uses professional talent and specializes in lifestyle, business and nature imagery.

Encounter with a Tornado

eNews Headline Image June 2014wAuthor

I am not superstitious but I find it interesting that my first encounter with a tornado happened on Friday, June 13th near Devil’s Tower, Wyoming.

My storm chasing trip started June 9th when I flew to Minneapolis to meet up with partners, Skip Talbot, forecaster and professional chaser (http://www.skip.cc/), and Jennifer Brindley, also a chaser and professional photographer (http://jenniferbrindleyphotography.com/storms/). This was to be an amazing eight-day adventure where we would see no fewer than six tornados.

Jennifer Brindley and Skip Talbot in front of Devil’s Tower (the site of the Close Encounter’s close encounter)

Jennifer Brindley and Skip Talbot in front of Devil’s Tower (the site of the Close Encounter’s close encounter)

On this day, the storm we would chase was expected to initiate in the late afternoon, so we took some time to hike and take a sightseeing trip to Devil’s Tower. Sure enough, by 4pm, a large storm sprang to life just west of Hulett, Wyoming and the chase was on.

Tornados typically form under the updraft base of a supercell thunderstorm. This is typically seen as a cloud lowering on the southern portion of the storm. As the base begins to rotate, a “hook” shape often forms on radar. This is a radar image of the storm taken from my phone as we made our approach (Yes, there’s an app for that!).

Tornados form under the updraft base of a supercell thunderstorm. This is typically seen as a cloud lowering on the southern portion of the storm. As the base begins to rotate, a “hook” shape often forms on radar. This is a radar image of the storm taken from my phone as we made our approach (Yes, there’s an app for that!).

Normally, when chasing storms in the Plain States, we are in open country, but this storm was maturing in the hilly country of the Bear Lodge Mountains. Very few highways intersect this area but we found a spot on Highway 24 about 15 miles southeast of Hulett. Our vantage point gave us a view to the northwest where the storm had just become Severe-Warned. The track of the storm was eastward, so it would likely make a close pass to our north.

Here I am filming the storm as it approached from the northwest. Skip Talbot is standing next to me. Photo by Jennifer Brindley.

Here I am filming the storm as it approached from the northwest. Skip Talbot is standing next to me. Photo by Jennifer Brindley.

The sky became dark and ominous, and the storm, which was now officially Tornado-Warned, showed obvious rotation at its base. Wind started gusting around us, and as the updraft base came closer  it became hidden by the foreground hills to our north. Little did we know that a strong tornado was at the heart of this rotating cloud. Soon it became obvious that the storm was becoming increasingly violent. White clouds were whipping across the ridge to our north. We felt a blast of hot air, then heard an unearthly crackling roar, both being signs that a tornado is very close. Strong winds forced me to move my camera to the shelter of the van.

Jennifer Brindley catches me moving the camera out of the wind.

Jennifer Brindley catches me moving the camera out of the wind.

 

This clip shows the rotating cloud to our north at its closest point.

Rotating Cloud (720p version)

We continued to be battered by winds that were as strong as any I have felt in my life, winds at our back that were attempting to draw us toward the storm. We felt another blast of hot air. Skip assured us that we were perfectly safe in this location.

Can you see the dark funnel shape in the center of this contrast-enhanced image?

Can you see the dark funnel shape in the center of this contrast-enhanced image?

This composite image shows our location southeast of Hulett, and the radar signature of the tornado at its beginning and at its end, with the white line connecting the two showing a possible path.

This composite image shows our location southeast of Hulett, and the radar signature of the tornado at its beginning and at its end, with the white line connecting the two showing a possible path.

Soon the winds died down as the storm passed to our northeast. As we drove away, Skip commented that we didn’t see a tornado, we experienced it. That sums it up nicely.  It was later classified as a strong EF-2 with winds of up to 120mph and a track of 18 miles. Fortunately it passed over sparsely populated country so there was no loss of life and only one injury. It did destroy a mobile home, several outbuildings, and mowed down a significant number of large ponderosa pine trees.

Damage photos from the Crook County Tornado

Damage photos from the Crook County Tornado

Damage photos from the Crook County Tornado

Damage photos from the Crook County Tornado

Damage photos from the Crook County Tornado

Damage photos from the Crook County Tornado

Damage photos from the Crook County Tornado

Damage photos from the Crook County Tornado

This was to be the first tornado encounter in an amazing storm chasing trip and was an experience I will never forget. Over the next few months, we’ll be doing the post work on the footage shot on the Epic, and we’ll make it available as soon as possible. There is so much I want to share, plus more tornado stories will be coming in future Artbeats eNewsletters, so stay tuned!

Artbeats Top 10

The Stories Behind Our Highest Selling Clips of 2013 I’ll start with the tenth most popular and count down to #1:

10. In The Clouds

008-C026

Clip #008-C026
Camera: RedONE M
Date: March, 2010
Location: Hawaii

Back in early 2010, I got a call from Doug Holgate who was scheduled to shoot aerials for the movie Soul Surfer. He said that the Pictorvision Eclipse, a gyrostabilized gimbal mounted on a helicopter, would need to be shuttled from Kauai to Kona: that is, from one end of the island chain to the other. He asked if I would be interested in arranging a film shoot during this trip. I jumped at the chance. So, after shooting Soul Surfer, the Artbeats RedONE was mounted on the Eclipse and the next morning we lifted off from the Princeville airport on the North side of Kauai. After shooting aerials of the island, we headed Southeast toward Oahu. Over the ocean we encountered low level clouds that were practically begging us to shoot them so we obliged.

Aerial cinematographer Doug Holgate next to the helicopter with the Eclipse mounted on the front. This was shot at the Princeville Airport just before lifting off.

Aerial cinematographer Doug Holgate next to the helicopter with the Eclipse mounted on the front. This was shot at the Princeville Airport just before lifting off.

Over the Pacific between Kauai and Oahu approaching the clouds we would shoot.

Over the Pacific between Kauai and Oahu approaching the clouds we would shoot.

 

9. Washington DC National Mall

Clip #A121-C010v2 Camera: Epic-X Date: November, 2011 Location: Washington DC

Clip #A121-C010v2
Camera: Epic-X
Date: November, 2011
Location: Washington DC

In November, 2011, after months of plowing through mounds of red tape, Artbeats was given the go-ahead to film in the no-fly zone over Washington. This was a huge coup for us as we were told by many in the DC community that there was no way we would get clearance. As far as we know, this is the only time such a waiver was given to a stock footage company. We did four filming sortees: two in the evening and two the next morning. We were required to have a police officer on board, and after we landed, military intelligence officers inspected every shot looking for anything that could be sensitive to national security. They erased about 5% of our footage. Our route instructions called for us to enter the DC area low over the Potomac River from the North. This shot was one of the first taken as we were still over the Potomac. As for most of our aerial shoots, we hired Doug Holgate as the camera operator and used the Pictorvision Eclipse gimbal. We shot in 5K with our Epic-X. The lens was an Optimo 24-250mm zoom. To view a demo of the DC footage click here.

Army intelligence officers looking over our footage.

Army intelligence officers looking over our footage.

Doug Holgate filming the Pentagon.

Doug Holgate filming the Pentagon.

 

8. Arizona Sunset

Clip #SE124 Camera: Mitchell 35mm Date: September 1998 Location: Near Flagstaff Arizona

Clip #SE124
Camera: Mitchell 35mm
Date: September 1998
Location: Near Flagstaff Arizona

A year after our first pyrotechnic shoots in 1997, I rented a Mitchell 35mm motion picture camera with a Norris intervalometer and took it to Arizona to film time-lapse storms and clouds. This was long before any digital camera had this capability. In fact, seeing a full-size motion picture camera on the side of the road was a rare event and captured a lot of attention wherever I went. The footage from that shoot went into the White Puffy Clouds, Storm Clouds, Light Clouds & Fog, and Sky Effects collections. Over the years the Sky Effects clips have been the most popular of the four. This particular shot was taken from a highway viewpoint just West of Flagstaff. It is one of the oldest shots in the Artbeats library and the oldest on this list.

 

7. Cloud Aerial

Clip #CF433 Camera: Sony F900R Date: April, 2007 Location: Somewhere over Arizona

Clip #CF433
Camera: Sony F900R
Date: April, 2007
Location: Somewhere over Arizona

Cloud Fly-Thrus has been a great category for Artbeats over the years. Unfortunately, POV cloud plates are very expensive to shoot and also risky, as the film maker may not be able to find the right kind of weather. In April, 2007, for instance, we spent five days chasing around the country looking for the right kind of clouds.  The challenge is to find cumulus clouds with well-defined shapes that are lower than 14,000 feet.  Above that altitude the pilot can no longer use Visual Flight Rules and must get tower permission for every direction he flies.  Also, ice forms on the front glass too easily at higher altitudes.  After trying Utah, Colorado, Texas, and Arizona we found the best clouds in Oregon, ironically directly over the area where I live. To film our cloud fly-thrus we use the Wolfe Air Learjet 25 outfitted with a nose camera mount plus the Vectorvision system, which is a periscope tube that extends down out of the belly of the jet. The above shot was taken using the nose camera mount. We typically use both camera systems whenever we contract with Wolfe Air.

Prepping the nose camera on the Wolfe Air Lear 25

Prepping the nose camera on the Wolfe Air Lear 25

Doug Holgate checks the 1/2” thick optical glass that covers the front of the nose mount. The glass was pitted and needed to be replaced at the last minute.

Doug Holgate checks the 1/2” thick optical glass that covers the front of the nose mount. The glass was pitted and needed to be replaced at the last minute.

Me in front of the Lear at Salt Lake City.

Me in front of the Lear at Salt Lake City.

 

6. New York City Aerial

Clip #A106-C036C Camera: Epic-X Date: November, 2011 Location: Downtown New York

Clip #A106-C036C
Camera: Epic-X
Date: November, 2011
Location: Downtown New York

In November, 2011 we set up a week-long aerial shoot in the region surrounding NYC. The main goal was to capture NYC and Boston, but we were also able to fit Washington DC into the itinerary, as we found out last minute that we had been granted the flight restriction waiver. This particular shot shows our movement traveling southeast over the Financial District, starting over Wall Street and ending at the East River. To view our New York Aerials demo click here.

The Epic rig on the Eclipse.

The Epic rig on the Eclipse.

The AStar Eurocopter ready to lift off from our base at Newark.

The AStar Eurocopter ready to lift off from our base at Newark.

 

5. Downtown LA Aerial

Clip #005-C036 Camera: RedONE Date: October, 2010 Location: Downtown LA

Clip #005-C036
Camera: RedONE
Date: October, 2010
Location: Downtown LA

When I got word that Pictorvision was testing out a new 3D camera rig for their Eclipse gimbal, I asked if I could be their first customer and run it through its paces. We set up the shoot for October 2010, in the LA area, with two prep days and one shoot day. At the end of the second prep day, we decided to take the camera up for some evening shots downtown. This was one of those shots. The direction of movement is south, looking down South Figueroa Street. Although this was shot in stereo 3D, the most popular sales have been of the 2D version.

Annette Gaillard (Artbeats camera tech) doing prep work on the two RedONE cameras.

Annette Gaillard (Artbeats camera tech) doing prep work on the two RedONE cameras.

Stereographer Ken Corben and OptiTek founder Jacek Jakowicz calibrating the lenses.

Stereographer Ken Corben and OptiTek founder Jacek Jakowicz calibrating the lenses.

Annette Gaillard(Artbeats Tech) and Jake Capistron (Pictorvision Tech) Rigging the Eclipse.

Annette Gaillard(Artbeats Tech) and Jake Capistron (Pictorvision Tech) Rigging the Eclipse.

 

4. Fiery Ground Explosion

Clip #016-C003 Camera: RedONE Date: February, 2011 Location: Myrtle Creek Oregon

Clip #016-C003
Camera: RedONE
Date: February, 2011
Location: Myrtle Creek Oregon

Pyrotechnic effects have been a crucial part of our library since the very beginning. In fact, the success of the ReelFire and ReelExplosions collections launched the Artbeats Digital Film Library in 1998. That represented the first of many pyrotechnic film shoots. In February of 2011 we continued this tradition by shooting pyrotechnics with a 3D stereo rig holding two RedONE cameras. The shot list included many fire effects such as this gasoline-based ground explosion. This particular shot took place on a ten-acre field in a rural area of Southern Oregon. We dug a hole about a foot deep and several feet wide, then placed a gunpowder charge in a plastic bag holding a gallon of gasoline, and put the bag in the hole. The purpose of the hole was to direct the explosion upwards, sideways and away from the cameras and crew. The powder charge contained an electrical squib that could be ignited from a safe distance. We placed the tripod about 80 feet from the “bomb”, then rolled the camera at a speed of about 60fps and ignited the charge. The resulting explosion was incredibly bright, hot, and noisy. Similar to clip #5, this was shot in Stereo 3D; however, the most popular version is 2D.

Placing the bag containing the gasoline in the hole. The powder charge with electrical wiring can be seen on the ground.

Larry Linton, our pyrotechnician, places the bag containing the gasoline in the hole. The powder charge with the squib wiring can be seen on the ground.

The crew and camera rig. From left to Right: Tina Torres, Donald Barrows, Diane Barrows, Sebastian Rabern, Phil Bates, Annette Gaillard.

The crew and camera rig. From left to Right: Tina Torres, Donald Barrows, Diane Barrows, Sebastian Rabern, Phil Bates, Annette Gaillard.

 

3. Spinning Globe

Clip # EV102A Source: Computer Generated with Satellite Data Date: July, 2000

Clip # EV102A
Source: Computer Generated with Satellite Data
Date: July, 2000

This is one of the oldest HD clips in our library and the only clip on the top 10 list that comes from an outside producer. Although we don’t publicize the names of the producers we represent, I can say that he comes from a highly respected Hollywood Effects company, and at one time, theirs was one of the globes in a Universal Film Feature Logo. This clip and those from the entire Earth Views Collection have retained their popularity for over thirteen years now.

 

2. Timelapse Clouds 

Clip # A072-C038
Camera: RedONE
Date: May, 2010
Location: Near Elk City, Oklahoma

In May, 2010 we contracted with a Storm Chasing Tour company to take us on a 10-day trek looking for tornadoes in the Midwest. This tour company had a perfect record of finding tornadoes for every tour they did. Unfortunately, our tour was the first one to break that record. Although we did not find any tornadoes, we did get some great cloud and storm shots, and this is one of the best. It is also the longest running shot in this list at 1 minute, 14 seconds in length. To see our storm demo click here. (This demo contains more footage from this shoot and others taken that same year.)

Annette scanning the sky while we were acquiring this shot.

Annette scanning the sky while we were acquiring this shot.

 

And finally, the top selling clip of 2013:

1. Cloud Aerial at Sunset

Clip #CF402 Camera: Sony F900R Date: April, 2007 Location: Somewhere over Southwestern Oregon

Clip #CF402
Camera: Sony F900R
Date: April, 2007
Location: Somewhere over Southwestern Oregon

After 5 days spent filming clouds.

Inside the cabin of the Learjet, I found it easiest to direct by communicating directly with the pilot and pointing where I wanted him to go. In the foreground the camera technician monitors the Vectorvision camera (another F900) pointing down and out the belly of the aircraft.

Inside the cabin of the Learjet, I found it easiest to direct by communicating directly with the pilot and pointing where I wanted him to go. In the foreground the camera technician monitors the Vectorvision camera (another F900) pointing down and out the belly of the aircraft.

Yours truly with Learjet Pilot, Tom McMurtry. Tom had distinguished career with NASA as a test pilot and flight director. He also co-piloted the 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft. He is an amazing pilot and one of the nicest guys you could meet. It was an honor to fly with him.

Yours truly with Learjet Pilot, Tom McMurtry. Tom had distinguished career with NASA as a test pilot and flight director. He also co-piloted the 747 Shuttle Carrier Aircraft. He is an amazing pilot and one of the nicest guys you could meet. It was an honor to fly with him.

 

4K Footage, Artbeats and You – Part 2

7 Examples of ways Artbeats maximizes 4K and Raw in our production workflow.

4K capture brings huge advantages to post-production. Production designers will use these advantages in different ways, depending on the application and finish. For stock footage production, we have our own specialized methods for exploiting all that resolution and color depth. In Part 2 of our series on 4K, I will share seven different ways we treat 4K and 5K footage in post to maximize quality and usability in our end product. These tips and tricks may give you some ideas on how to process your own 4K footage.

First, I need to explain that Artbeats offers two varieties of 4K footage, Raw and Color Corrected. The Raw version is for those that want to do their own color treatment and the Color Corrected is our own best attempt at being true to the original scene, giving moderate saturation and contrast without crushing blacks or clipping highlights. We also improve, or adjust, other aspects of the footage as needed. (What I am sharing below are just some of the things we do in our post-production workflow for the Color Corrected version.)

1. Cropping for composition.

The nature of our shooting is often “in the moment” as things are happening. We do not always have time to frame our shots perfectly. The 4K image gives us room to adjust the position easily while still fitting in a UHD (Ultra HD) frame size of 3880×2160.

Below is an illustration of how much room we have to crop while still maintaining 4K or UHD frame size:

Cropping chart

When we shoot aerials, we have found that some gyrostabilization gimbals do not always get the horizon level. We can do almost 2° of horizon correction while still staying within the 4K or UHD frame. Here is an example showing the rotation fix and the 4K image: (surrounding image darkened to emphasize final crop)

Tilt within cropping 630

Here is another example showing a crop to compensate for a lens distortion fix:

Lens Correction Finished Size 630

2. Adjusting Stabilization.

This is similar to #1 in that we are using the extra size of the image to give us room to apply a fix. In this case we are adjusting for undesirable wobble or shakiness, and also rotation since the horizon didn’t stay level. Once we stabilize the clip it usually still wanders outside the UHD crop, so we apply Bezier position fixes that “smooth out” the worst part of the instability while allowing some of the natural camera motion, thus keeping the image within the UHD frame size. This clip shows a side-by-side example of the kind of stabilization fixes that are common for us:

3. Cropping for driving plate format.

Our 5-Angle driving plates use a wider format than is typical. Since the top and bottom of the image is rarely used for these kinds of plates, we use a very wide-angle lens and crop to 3840×1200:

Driving Plate Crop

4. Matching frames and adjusting parallax for perfect HD 3D.

Even identical lenses won’t yield images that perfectly match. We found that we needed to adjust rotation, scale, position and then apply a mesh warp to compensate for lens distortion in order to match the left with the right.  Then, proper parallax can be adjusted by moving one side horizontally. With 4K we can do all this and keep a clean image within a UHD frame.

5. Adding camera moves.

Sometimes a static shot needs a little movement to add interest. We can add subtle pan, tilt and zooms while still holding resolution in the UHD frame.

6. Adjusting mattes for compositing.

In the following example, we filmed tree shadows blowing in the wind. We used white foam core for the surface to capture the shadow. Unfortunately, it wasn’t practical to position the camera directly above the surface, so we shot it “off angle” as seen below:

Tree shadow as shot

Then in post we used Corner Pin to distort the foam core back to a rectangular shape and optimized to fit in a UHD frame size. Next, we removed color to give maximum contrast for the matte. Because we shot these images in 5K, the distortion didn’t soften the image excessively:

Tree Shadow matte fixed

Then we used the matte on a background texture to indicate light and shadow as if streaming through a window:

Background texture with tree shadow

7. Using Raw color depth to apply HDR (high dynamic range).

The problem with high contrast images is that detail and color are lost in highlights and shadows. Granted, the camera may have enough dynamic range to preserve detail in those areas; however, color saturation is lost the closer you get to the lightest highlights and the darkest of shadows. Adding saturation to the image doesn’t really help since it brings chroma higher in the mids keeping the chroma of the whole image still out of balance.

However, we have found that a 4K raw image set to a higher ISO preserves more chroma and detail in the shadows, while a lower ISO setting preserves more chroma in the highlights. In the case below, we imported the same Raw 4K file twice into After Effects, and set one ISO at 800 and the other at 500:

HDR ISO settings

Then we took the brighter version and made a grayscale matte using a desatured version of the image. We added contrast to clip the highlights and crush the shadows slightly. Here we show the matte, the 800 ISO and the 500 ISO image:

DC composite 630

By combining these images using the matte, we get the HDR result. Below, we show a “before and after” example of what the HDR treatment does. Notice the richer color in the sky and water:

DC HDR compare 630

In the case below, we used the blue channel to create the mask because the goal was to darken the sky:

Desert composite 630

Here is another example of a problematic high contrast shot showing  the shot with and without HDR treatment. Notice that the detail and color in the lumber highlights is preserved in the HDR version. Notice the richer color of the grass. (This example is without any saturation added.)

Sawing compare

We hope you have enjoyed this little tour of how we make the most of our 4K and 5K footage in post, and perhaps it can inspire you to experiment as well.

4K Footage, Artbeats And You

As we follow trends in the production industry, the phrase we keep hearing is this: HD is not enough. The world is quickly turning to 4K as the new high resolution standard. 4K cameras have been around for several years and 4K TV’s are showing up on Amazon for under $1000. We believe that you will be using 4K soon, if you are not already. So, we’ve been busy building a library of thousands of 4K shots since RED released the first 4K digital cinema camera in 2007.

But what really is 4K and how can it impact your work? I’ll answer these questions from Artbeats’ perspective.

First, how do we define 4K? It is the term used to define an image that is close to 4,000 pixels wide.  I say “close” because depending on the camera, monitor, or playing device, 4K size can vary. At a minimum 4K must be 3840 x 2160 pixels which is the most common resolution accepted by TV’s and 4K players. This is also known as Ultra HD, UHD, Quad HD, 4K HD and even just 4K.

UHD is exactly twice the HD height and width, which takes up 4 times the real estate of HD as shown by this chart:

UHD Chart

4K cameras come in a variety of resolutions. At the time of this writing, here are most of the 4K cameras available:

Sony FDR-AX1: 3840 x 2160
Sony F55: 4096 x 2160 and 3840 x 2160
Sony PXW-Z100: 4096 x 2160 and 3840 x 2160 (to be released by end of 2013)
Canon C500: 4096 x 2160
Blackmagic Design 4K: 3840 x 2160
JVC GY-HMQ10 4K: 3840 x 2160
GoPro 4K: 4096 x 2160 (12fps, maximum)

RED Cameras can do the above resolutions and higher:

RED One: Max 4480 x 2304
RED Scarlet: 3840 x 2160 (5120 x 2700 at 12fps)
RED Epic: 5120 x 2700
RED Epic Dragon: 6140 x 3160

This chart shows how these resolutions compare to each other and to HD.

Size Comparison Overlay

If you commonly work in HD resolutions, you may look at this chart and say that 4K looks like a huge overkill. You simply do not need that many pixels and the hassle of dealing with larger files. However, even if your final project will be distributed as HD, 4K will give you sharper HD images, with better color and deeper dynamic range. To show how this works, we shot a scene with an EPIC and 2 HD cameras, a Sony XDCAM, and a Canon 5D Mark II. The Epic we shot in both 4K and 5K resolutions. We matched the frame exactly when shooting regardless of the resolution. The size comparison of these files matches the resolution chart above.

Size Comparison

If you show each image as-is without any scaling, you can see that the 4K and 5K images show much more detail. (The images below have been cropped to fit on the page.)

Resolution Comparison

But what if your production will be delivered on HD?  Do you really need 4K source footage?  After all, you will be scaling down the 4K frames to HD size anyway.  I have done that with this next chart:

HD Scaled Comparison

Again, we are showing cropped images here, just a tiny portion of the full image. As you can see, the HD images sourced on 4K and 5K are cleaner, sharper, more true to life. Cameras generally yield images with less detail because of the limitations of the sensor, recording system –which often uses compression–, and lens. The workable resolution, called measured resolution is significantly less than the pixel resolution, typically about 80% less.  The pixels are still there, but the absolute highest level of detail the camera can deliver will always be less. So, an HD image of 1920 pixels wide has a measured resolution of around 1530 pixels. A 4K image has a measured resolution of 3.3K and so on.  Eventually, producers will want a 4K measured resolution, which is why Artbeats is shooting footage at 5K resolutions and higher.

Why can’t cameras with a resolution of 1920×1080 deliver a true 1920×1080 measured resolution? Due to the pattern of red, green, and blue sensor sites (called a Bayer pattern), the processing that must be done (called Demosaic) will yield less than if each individual site contained all the RGB information. The recording system and the lens will also play a part in how soft the final image is. Cameras typically have detail enhancement or other sharpening algorithms at work to compensate for this softness. This sharpening can cause artifacts like “ringing” which makes high contrast edges look stressed. You can see this effect in the XDCAM example above.  The effect is also visible on the word “Eat” with the Canon 5D MII.

Granted, this is not a perfectly fair comparison.  The Canon 5D MII and XDCAM recording systems are inferior to REDcode in ways that go beyond resolution. For example, some of what you are seeing in the comparison are compression artifacts.  Regardless, the principle still applies, that a scaled 4K image will still be superior to a 1920 x 1080 capture, even if it is shot on a high-end HD camera.

Other benefits of 4K to HD scaling include better color and dynamic range, (which means that the image has a lower noise floor). How does this work? The process is called over-sampling. If you think of scaling an image to fifty percent of its size, then we are averaging every 4 pixels into every 1. That’s 4 times the information in each pixel vs. each pixel generated by an HD camera! Scaling down always yields a similar benefit, especially if you are scaling to 80% or less.

As you can see, starting your production workflow with 4K sources has merit.  However, if you are shopping for footage at Artbeats, do you always have to purchase 4K footage to get the benefit of over-sampling? Not in every case. If the footage was shot on a 4K camera, the HD footage will have been scaled from 4K, yielding a much cleaner image than that shot with an HD camera. How do you know if the shot you are interested in was sourced in 4K resolution? Each clip has an information page that shows a series of tabs in the middle. If you see a 4K tab, then you know that the HD was scaled down, giving you the benefit of 4K over-sampling. Even a 3K tab will give you a similar benefit to the HD footage.

4K Tab

Our 4K footage spans a wide range of subjects from nature to lifestyles to aerials. We’ve prepared a demo to give you a taste of the diversity within our 4K library. Just click here to view.

In Part 2, I will continue to share how 4K footage impacts production and the stock footage world.

A Little Help from Your (New) Friends

RC-FH138-024

Clip name: RC-FH138-024

Have you ever hit a creative editing brick wall? You have the beginnings of a good idea, but just can’t seem to pull it all together because you lack a particular skill or can’t make your software do what’s in your head. It suddenly occurs to you that you may just be trying to reinvent the wheel, and someone with more experience has already designed a better wheel (or plug-in) that will do more than you ever knew possible. That’s when you realize you need a little help from your friends in the post-production creative world. But if you don’t know anyone like that, then what do you do?

It might be time to think about joining a User Group. While it may sound like something you need therapy for, it’s actually a place where highly creative editing software users pool ideas, share insights, and encourage each other with training, tips, tricks, and other resources. Artbeats is a proud sponsor of several such groups, as well as being a creative resource with over 75 free tutorials on our own site. We know the better educated our customers are, the better they can make use of our wide variety of stock footage. One of our latest video tutuorials was created by Ben Balser, who is not only an Apple Certified Master Trainer, but is founder of just such an organization, the Louisiana Cajun Cutters FCP Users Group. If the experts gather to share their knowledge, it’s a good indication that some great learning goes on there.

So whether you’re a Final Cut Pro user, an After Effects fan, a Premier Pro or an Apple Motion follower, Smoke or Mocha type, there’s a user community out there for you. You’ll find a network of editors just like yourself all around the world who are anxious to share their knowledge and expertise through video demos, written tutorials, blog posts, podcasts and articles. Their meetings are fun and informative, with amazing presentations sure to inspire you and get you not only past that brick wall, but well on your way to becoming the top notch designer you know you are. And, you won’t feel out of place whether you’re a novice or a pro, because even the experts feed off of each other’s ideas.

Don’t be shy. You’re sure to be enlightened, encouraged, and included. Someday you may be the one sharing your expertise with your (new) friends. And you might just win a cool prize from Artbeats or one of many other sponsors who know that User Groups are the place to be. So go, make new friends and learn a thing or two.
Resources:
Final Cut https://www.apple.com/finalcutpro/resources/communities.html

After Effects
http://ae.groups.adobe.com/

Creative Cow
http://library.creativecow.net/video-tutorials

Artbeats
http://www.artbeats.com/video_tutorials

User Groups Artbeats Sponsors
http://www.artbeats.com/user_groups